The Value of Cleaning – INDUSTRY OVERVIEW

The Value of Cleaning – INDUSTRY OVERVIEW

ISSA has released a new analysis of data which strongly supports the position that cleaning is economically efficient and, thus, a relatively modest investment in improved cleaning produces substantial returns.

CLICK HERE to download the new Value of Clean Paper and learn more about justifying your cleaning budgets in a completely new way with hard numbers decision makers are looking for.

The following general overview of the industry is an introductory excerpt from the paper and sets the stage for an understanding of the economic benefits that result from an increased investment in cleaning, which will be covered in future posts:


Industry Overview

Economic Impact

The janitorial services industry (SIC 7349/NAICS 561720) is part of the $33 billion facility services industry (United States Economic Census, 2007). It is one of the largest and most dynamic service industries in the world.  There are more than 2.3 million service workers (Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, 2012) and in excess of more than 53,000 building service contractors in the United States that provide professional janitorial services to a variety of building types (United States Economic Census, 2007).

The U.S. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey counted more than 4.9 million commercial buildings in the United States with more than 71.6 billion square feet of floor space (Energy Information Administration, 2003). 

Service Providers

Professional commercial janitorial services companies have the opportunity to provide services to a wide range of clients.  At one end of the spectrum are commercial facilities such as office buildings, high-rise office complexes, distribution facilities, food processing plants, hospitals, nursing homes, airport and mass transit terminals, government offices, and industrial plants.

In addition to the contracted service sector, many universities, K-12 schools, healthcare, hospitality, manufacturing, and other industries employ their own cleaning staffs.

The industry’s breadth and high degree of fragmentation are driven by relatively low barriers to entry and only minimal differentiation.  Consequently, janitorial services have been largely cost driven.  This cost-centered focus has led many contractors to cut corners in order to remain competitive.  The result is inconsistent service.  Facility decision makers have responded by using two approaches in tandem to deliver quality services in a cost-effective manner: Quality Standards and The Value of Cleaning.

Quality Standards

The ISSA Cleaning Industry Management Standard (CIMS) and CIMS-Green Building (CIMS-GB) criteria and certification program provide a powerful tool that can be used to measure the quality of a janitorial services company’s management structure, cleaning operations and green cleaning services.  The Standard sets forth the processes, procedures, and supporting documentation proven to be characteristic of customer-driven organizations. CIMS and CIMS-GB are divided into six areas of management best practices:

1.         Quality systems

2.         Service delivery

3.         Human resources

4.         Health, safety, and environmental stewardship

5.         Management commitment

6.         Green Building (for CIMS-GB)

The Value of Cleaning

With the increased focus on sustainability and public health protection, progressive professional janitorial cleaning services are adopting a more holistic approach to cleaning.  They have learned that cleaning impacts a wide array of business functions and that relatively small incremental investments in cleaning produce outsized gains for the organization.

Watch for future posts from this white paper which will identify the business activities that professional janitorial services cleaning impacts and will quantify the returns that cleaning investments produce.

 


In 2006, ISSA convened technical committees comprised of industry experts from different disciplines to develop the framework for quality management principles for cleaning organizations.  The result of their efforts is the Cleaning Industry Management Standard (CIMS).  CIMS applies to management, operations, performance systems, and processes.  A free copy of the standard, organizational checklist, contract requirement wording, a list of certified firms and ISSA Certification Experts (I.C.E.) can be downloaded at www.issa.com/cims (ISSA, 2009).

About ISSA

The leading trade association for the cleaning industry worldwide, ISSA has a membership that includes more than 6,100 distributors, manufacturers, building service contractors, in-house service providers, and others interested in the cleaning industry. ISSA helps its members and their employees make valuable contacts through the industry’s largest cleaning shows, produced in conjunction with Amsterdam RAI, under the brand name ISSA/INTERCLEAN®.
ISSA also helps increase professionalism and networking opportunities through its global Web site, ISSA.com, and by offering business tools, industry standards – including the popular CIMS/CIMS-GB program – and legislative and regulatory services. It is through these initiatives that ISSA increases awareness of the true value of clean and its impact on human health, the environment, and a better bottom line. The association is headquartered in Lincolnwood, IL, USA. For more information, visit www.issa.com.

Dan Wagner

Dan Wagner is ISSA's Director of Facility Service Programs and has been with ISSA since November of 1999. He is primarily responsible for leading the association's sustainability and facility service programs, including the Cleaning Industry Management Standard & CIMS-Green Building Certification Program and Transpare. Dan has published numerous articles and spoken at various conferences, workshops and seminars on CIMS, standardization, management principles, and the true value of clean.

Dan is also a noted "subject matter expert" on green cleaning and a sought after speaker on environmental preferability, sustainability and green operations and maintenance. He has served as an SME for the International Facility Management Association and IFMA Foundation and is a co-author of the Foundation's "Global Guide on Green Cleaning," as well as a primary contributor to the "Business of Green Cleaning" manual.

Dan is also the association's Director of Facility Service Legislative Affairs and in-house legal counsel, having received his Juris Doctor degree from DePaul University in 1998. He is also a licensed attorney in the State of Illinois; a member of the American Bar Association, the Illinois Bar Association, the American Society of Association Executives; and serves on the Board of Directors of the National Floor Safety Institute.

About ISSA

The leading trade association for the cleaning industry worldwide, ISSA has a membership that includes more than 6,100 distributors, manufacturers, building service contractors, in-house service providers, and others interested in the cleaning industry. ISSA helps its members and their employees make valuable contacts through the industry’s largest cleaning shows, produced in conjunction with Amsterdam RAI, under the brand name ISSA/INTERCLEAN®.

ISSA also helps increase professionalism and networking opportunities through its global Web site, ISSA.com, and by offering business tools, industry standards – including the popular CIMS/CIMS-GB program - and legislative and regulatory services. It is through these initiatives that ISSA increases awareness of the true value of clean and its impact on human health, the environment, and a better bottom line. The association is headquartered in Lincolnwood, IL, USA. For more information, visit www.issa.com.

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